Wednesday, November 18, 2009

Goodbye, Grandma

In honor of my grandma's passing on Oct. 30th, I'm posting a copy of her obituary...
Oneeta Reuter

Funeral service for Oneeta Wanda Reuter, 96, Tucson, Ariz., formerly of Anoka, took place Nov. 16 at Thurston-Lindberg Funeral Chapel, Anoka. Rev. Gary Wilkerson.

Reuter died Oct. 30. She was born April 13, 1913 in Kiota, Mo., to Charles E. and Fanny F. (Gault) Tracy and was a retired nurse at the state hospital.

She is survived by her children, Charles Reuter, Dallas (Nancy) Reuter and Mary Kay (Larry) Schmidt; 13 grandchildren; 19 great-grandchildren; eight great-great-grandchildren; and nieces and nephews.

Interment was at Forest Hill Cemetery, Anoka. Arrangements were by Thurston-Lindberg Funeral Home, Anoka.

My grandma was also famous in our family for having a quaint colloquialism for pretty much any situation. Here are a few I could think of off the top of my head:

  • "Excuse the pig, the hog's out walkin'." (used when one of us burped, a personal favorite of mine.)

  • "I'm so hungry I could eat the north end of a southbound horse."

  • "I'm so hungry my stomach thinks my throat's been cut."

  • "If wishes were horses, beggars would ride."

  • "It's like straining at a gnat and swallowing a camel."


Updated 12/2:

  • I haven't . . . since Hector was a pup.

  • . . . 'til who laid the rail.

  • . . . (doing/going something) hell bent fer 'lection.

  • He's as thick in the muck as she is in the mire.

  • I've gotta pee so bad I can taste it.

  • She already had a stallion in the paddock.

4 comments:

  1. Very, very nice, Tim - Grandma would have been proud!

    BTW, although more of the "Grandmaisms" will no doubt occur to us over time, Mom thinks the second one was usually phrased, "I'm so hungry I could eat the north end of a horse going south"

    Grandma was a classic, and will be missed by us all . . . keep in mind what Pastor Wilkerson said about your quilts. I was reminded again just last night as we took out a quilt for Maria and Matt, and there was Grandma's hand sewn signature on the back side.

    Dad

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  2. Nice post Tim. Don't know exactly what it meant, but another "Grandmaism" I can think of was: "You can live in hope if you die in despair."

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  3. I thought of another one, but it's not really a saying like the ones that have already been posted. How about the message Grandma left on the answering machine at the Plymouth house when she got all flustered? I think it went something like this when she was about to hang up:

    "...in Jesus' name...I mean, oh sorry" (click)

    Classic!!

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